Hospitality

Hospitality areas need to be covered by a valid TV Licence if any staff or customers watch or record live TV programmes on any channel, or download or watch any BBC programmes on iPlayer – live, catch up or on demand. This includes the use of devices such as a TV, desktop computer, laptop, mobile phone, tablet, games console, digital box or DVD/VHS recorder.

Find out more about watching live TV.

A hospitality area is any premise, other than a hotel, that provides rooms, corporate boxes or other similar places (units) for guests’ entertainment at an event - for instance, a sports stadium, club or ground. The cost of your licence will be based on the number of units where TV receiving equipment is installed or used.

Managers must make sure that these units are correctly licensed. If they don’t then they can be fined up to £1,000 per offence.


Cost of a hospitality TV Licence

To cover up to 15 units

You only need to pay one fee of £145.50

To cover more than 15 units

You pay one fee for the first 15 units and an additional fee of £145.50 for every extra 5 units (or fewer).

Apply for a hospitality TV Licence

Please complete the application form then print and return to us at:

TV Licensing
Payments and Commercial Licensing
Darlington
DL98 1TL.

How to pay

You can pay for your hospitality TV Licence by cheque or by BACS electronic transfer. You must pay the licence fee in full as there is no facility to spread the cost.

Pay by BACS electronic transfer

Your bank will require the following details about TV Licensing's account:

Bank: National Westminster

Sort code: 60-80-09

Account number: 30287545

Reference: Your reference number

If you are an existing customer, your nine digit reference number can be found on any correspondence from us. If you are a new customer, please quote your establishment name on the BACS payment.

You don’t need a TV Licence for
  • Watching on demand or catch up programmes on services other than BBC iPlayer
  • Watching S4C TV on demand or listening to radio on iPlayer
  • Streaming, renting or buying movies from providers like Sky, Virgin Media, BT TV, Netflix or Amazon
  • Watching DVDs, Blu-rays or videos
  • Playing internet video clips through services like YouTube or to play video games
  • CCTV.

Tell us you don't need a TV Licence


If you still have questions take a look at TV Licensing FAQs where you can find all the answers in one place.